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Native American Mascots

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 6 months ago

Thoughts for in-class discussion:  Why do sports teams use humans as mascots?

 

 

Minnesota

Vikings: The Viking people came from three countries of Scandinavia: Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

They were also known as the Norse people. They were mostly farmers, but some worked as craftsmen or traders.

“The name 'Viking' comes from my language which is called 'Old Norse'. It means 'a pirate raid'.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/vikings/invasion/index.shtml

 

San Diego

Named for the Padres (Spanish for Priest) of the Roman Catholic Mission

San Diego de Alcala, which was founded in San Diego in the 1700's.

http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nl/sdpadres/padres.html

 

West Virginia University

One of the most beloved of all West Virginia athletic traditions, The Mountaineer mascot,

first appeared at WVU sporting events during the 1936-37 school year.

http://alumni.wvu.edu/traditions/mountaineer_mascot/

 

University of Idaho

The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman

Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa            

http://history-world.org/vandals.htm

 

University of Notre Dame

Irish: Notre Dame's nickname is inherited from Irish immigrant soldiers who fought in the

Civil War with New York City's Irish Brigade, recollected among other places in the poetry of Joyce

Kilmer who served with one of the Irish Brigade regiments during World War I.

http://www.answers.com/topic/notre-dame-fighting-irish-1

 

 

 

 

 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a8/MinnesotaVikings_1000.png/100px-MinnesotaVikings_1000.pngThe image “http://sandiego.padres.mlb.com/mlb/images/kids/y2004/sd_mascot118x177.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.http://images.footballfanatics.com/productImages/_71000/FF_71806_s.jpghttp://www.pkmeco.com/images/jv1.jpghttp://www.hallofween.com/content/Portals/5/fighting-irish.jpg

 

 

Here are some questions that might help you consider how to approach the issue for our role-play:

 

 

•    Discuss any possible differences in the representations of people in the mascots above and the Native American mascots below.

 

 The mascots above can be interpreted in ways that are disrespectful of other people and not just the Native Americans. Theese mascots below are mascots taht can offend the Native Americans because they are indians and they make think that they are making fun of them when they are trutly trying to respect them. The Mascots above also do not show a real person, they are cartoons and the others are costumes or just a symbol. The native american mascot is a human on a horse.

 

 

 

•    Do Native Americans and non-Native Americans perceive the mascot differently?

 

 Yes, some Native Americans find if offensive and many Americans see it as we are respecting the Native American tribes.

 

 

 

 

 

•    Is there a significant difference between how the mascot may have been intended and how it is interpreted?

 

 The mascots are intended as a symbol of respect.

 

 

 

 

•    How should an organization respond if its well-intentioned actions unintentionally offend a member of the group's religious or ethnic beliefs?

 

 

 They should greatly apologize and give big consideration to changing the schools mascot to somthing more respectful cause there are plently of symbols that can replace the indian mascot.

 

 

 

•    Are there other symbols that represent the community or school's values that could be used in place of the existing mascot?

 

 

 

 

 

 

These last questions were taken from: http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/deputy/Documents/schoolmascots.htm

 

 

 

 

http://www.johndavidhead.com/jhead/johnhead.nsf/dx/070218_chief2_hmed_4p.hmedium.jpg/$file/070218_chief2_hmed_4p.hmedium.jpg

 

 

 

Target.com sells these Native American Smurfs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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